vegetables

Highly Underrated Beet Greens

Love spinach and swiss chard? If your answer is “yes”, then you will definitely be a fan of beet greens. For anyone who isn’t exactly sure what I’m referring to, it’s exactly what you would expect – the green leaves attached to beets. Have you been throwing them away? Don’t! Buying a bunch of beets can become a double dose of veggies. Beet greens are delicious and highly delicious. Have you tried them yet?  Here is my favorite way to make them…

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled & chopped
  • 1 bunch beet greens
  • 1 tablespoon Bragg Liquid Aminos or sea salt to taste
  • a sprinkle of fresh lemon juice (optional)

How to:

  1. Heat olive oil in a skillet
  2. Add garlic, greens, liquid aminos/salt
  3. Stir frequently until greens are wilted down (only takes a few minutes)
  4. Sprinkle lemon juice for a little zing
  5. Enjoy!

Serves 1 – 2 servings (depending on how much you love your greens ;))

Photo Credit: the daily green

Quick Natural Facts: Vegetables

  • Broccoli, Cauliflower and Kale help the body break down harmful forms of estrogen.

  • Onions, Leeks, Chives, Garlic, and Shallots help detoxify the liver.

  • Chili Peppers reduce the risk of high blood pressure, stroke and heart disease. They also curb food cravings, especially for sweets.


Spinach & Beet’s Cousin – Swiss Chard

Nutrition Information for Swiss chard (1 cup cooked):

  • Fiber: 3.7 grams
  • Magnesium: 150 mg
  • Vitamin C: 31.5 mg
  • Vitamin E: 3.31 mg
  • Vitamin K: 572.8 mcg

In addition, Swiss chard contains beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin, which help maintain eye health and reduce the risk of cataracts. Chard also contains B6 and potassium, which may reduce the risk of heat disease and high blood pressure.

You can find three types of chard in stores and farmers’ markets: Rainbow (colorful stalks), Fordhook Giant (crinkly leaves and thick, white stalks), and Ruby Red/Rhubarb (thin, red stalks and slightly stronger taste).

Both the leaves and stalks of chard are edible. Personally, I love swiss chard sauteed with a little olive oil and garlic with a dash of sea salt and fresh ground black pepper. It’s so delicious (and healthy)!